Harold López-Nussa Trio. Photo: Gabriel Bianchini / Mack Avenue.

The syncopated wave of "A Day Anyone"

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The hook begins in the title and on the cover, curiously challenging as his syncopated outburst. A Day Any, the fifth album of the Cuban pianist, Harold López-Nussa, was conceived - at least that's what the author makes us believe - with the naturalness of those who meet with friends to play music and find inspiration in the solitude of the studio or sitting in the Malecón wall. If something is clear from the beginning, we are in the presence of an elite, creative and very personal jazz.

In this spontaneous phonographic experiment the trio falls on its feet. The consolidated style of Harold Lopez-Nussa is coupled in impetuous sound plasticity to the bassist Gastón Joya and the battery of his brother Ruy, forming this perfect trio of confluences that never breaks down along the phonogram, while developing an accentuated seal and singular.

Although on different occasions these musicians have met on the calendar to brandish some chords, this is the first record they decide to make in a trio format. Always on the lookout for the clash of sonorities, López-Nussa, now sailing through his thirties, joins his usual verve with an intuitive and very suggestive musical ability, where he alternates as is common in him the exemplary execution of jazz and traditional Cuban music.

López-Nussa's career encompasses styles with the elegance of those who carry music in their veins. Being born in a family of virtuosos contributed a lot to their formation. His father Ruy López-Nussa is an esteemed drummer and educator, his uncle, Ernán López-Nussa, a renowned pianist and his late mother, Mayra Torres, was a well-known piano teacher. However, in the search for its own sound, Harold's career has greatly evolved musically.

Having experimented with a globalized sound in his previous phonogram Trip -Number 1 on iTunes Jazz Chart and the second on Amazon's Amazon Chart-, where he nurtured his band with additional instruments and influences, including Senegalese bassist Alune Wade, now returns musically to his origins and to the Africanness that has so much defined his style.

In A Day Any Nussa's own compositions pass in impeccable musical progression towards the very successful versions, with an excellent balance of the sound mass and with a totally organic rhythmic base. Each piece guarantees a trip to the musical vision of the artist: contemporary, Cuban, African ...

The phonogram composed by eleven tracks he recreates summit pieces of anthological composers of Cuban music, although the main theme is the pianist's original songs, mostly created for this album. And it is that López-Nussa is a really inventive musician who does not stop producing, as if the melodies caught him in any corner of the planet and at any time of the day.

In My Son Cerra'o, relives those first and unforgettable jazz downloads that took place in Cuba from the hand of Bebo Valdés and other greats of that stage. On the other hand, his version of the subject Contigo en la distancia, a bolero by Cuban singer-songwriter Cesar Portillo de la Luz, so often played on piano for Omara Portuondo, leaves us with a delicious but different flavor, showing that the imaginative harmonic architecture of Harold Lopez-Nussa always finds a margin for overlapping reinvention.

Other versions that we can find on the disk are Conga Total / The Cumbanchero, by Puerto Rican composer Rafael Hernández Marín, as well as Dance of Los Ñañigos and La Negra danced, of the teacher Ernesto Lecuona, ancestral interpretations, but at the same time so contemporary in the arrangements that are magical.

In the downloads Harold's piano glows and unleashes with just doses of skill and musical genius for the feast of jazz resources that he delivers. There are not missing the stop-time nor the changing times. Undoubtedly, we are in the presence of a composer very integrated to the tradition, who gives voice to the ancestors with the naturalness and devotion of a state of grace.

A Day Any it opens to this virtuoso and to his superlative trio new paths. This album is part of López-Nussa's career at a time when his career is greatly influenced by the music of Cuba and the United States in ways that transcend the notions of "Latin jazz".

With this phonogram, the pianist repeats the experience of recording with the American label Mack Avenue Records. The album is produced by Swami Jr., counting on the executive production of Gretchen Valade. Recorded and mixed at WGBH Studios by Antonio Oliart. Mastered by Mark Wilder at Battery Mastering Studios.

This is an intimate album full of sparks. Listening A Day Any you abandon yourself to a surprising and beautiful harmony. You move from pure delight to the sound environment featuring three artists who make music for simple and sovereign joy. The result: a spontaneous album, one of those that should always be on hand to give a special touch to any day.

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