William Vivanco in Cuban Art Factory. Photo: Larisa López.
William Vivanco in Cuban Art Factory. Photo: Larisa López.

The Thirteen with Magic by William Vivanco

4 minutos / Rogelio Ramos Domínguez

12.10.2018 / Reviews

When William Vivanco lived in Santiago de Cuba, the friends climbed up to the second floor of his house to surprise us with those songs that the troubadour spent hours listening to, the same about Africa, about Brazil, that about our country.

Already in Havana, Vivanco - again a floor above his hall - maintains the habit of scrutinizing the musical knowledge of always while attentive to the sound of time that touches us. From early on he discovered that he likes to investigate and cross genres, rhythms from Cuba and other countries. Staying in the ballad or the pure sound sounds too boring for him, and it is in the author's song where he finds the freedom to rearm all that to his liking. "It's my passion," he says, "to look for challenges, look for rhythms, and finally achieve a product, a song that teaches something and with that contribute to my time".

Result of these customs, and supported by its usual resources - originality in the texts and music, together with a very personal voice and way of playing the guitar - comes the album Thirteen with Magic, his production that is close to finding the final point, after several attempts and after about two years of work in recording the songs.

Before Vivanco made melancholic songs, but has come to the conclusion that the human being needs to be happier, that there is less and less war, that conflicts end. "I do not like that about 'I'm going to cut my veins', he explains, "we came to pleasure and to be happy". For him his job is to get the magic out of affairs, find the side less sad or negative. That does not mean that I equate joy with simplicity. "The poetry within that happiness and those rhythms is important," he says, "it's a legacy that you leave behind, so I also like people to listen to music and discover new things at the same time."

This is an album with an almost schizophrenic diversity, where kizomba, danzón, charleston, mozambique, Haitian merengue, changüí mixed with waltz and ancient montuno coexist without complex and there is still space for congo lament.

To shape such a horn of plenty, William had the collaboration of artists such as José Luis Cortés, who had appeared in several of his concerts and had declared his taste for his music; Samuel Formell, David Suini; the guitarist Jesusín; Israel Rojas, who accompanies him on the subject Charleston 21 and where they let loose to talk about the relaxation that this world is; and David Torrens, with whom he pays an old debt that they had after recording years before some tracks that they finally lost.

Although finally decided to be his own producer, Vivanco would have loved to have in that role Eduardo Cabra "Visitor", with whom he has a particular empathy and who has expressed on several occasions the admiration he feels for the artist from Santiago. "I tell you that if we welcome him better here on the island, in this place where there is so much talent, he could do a lot," he tells me. "Personally we have things in common; That concept of homeland and roots that he placed on Calle 13 is more or less what I think. "

In fact, they were designing some themes of Thirteen with magic; they started working in Changüí in Paris, and in a short time they realized the interesting things they could do, but finally the project was truncated, although it does not lose the hope that they can meet again and enter the studio. They have a lot of music to do together, he says.

As we talk about all this, he reads a text message that came to his phone:

"I think it's tremendous, I think the sound concept is very good, that's the right way, I love it. "

"I just sent Israel Rojas; He tells me about the song we recorded together, and what he says happens to me too. I'm loving it. "

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Rogelio Ramos Domínguez

Writer of verses and songs. Full-time journalist and especially father of Claudia Ramos.

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